Category Archives: Manga Pulse

Manga Pulse 391: Soma Rings

We like to have some post show discussions once in awhile. They usually aren’t recorded as they’re not very long. Tim is always begging off because he says he needs to go eat. This is accompanied by him dramatically clutching his middle and collapsing into a heap while asking for soup or breadsticks like this is an Olive Garden and not a makeshift recording studio.

Appropriate then that Tim reviews Shokugeki no Soma. Soma is a student who works at a ramen shop and is attempting to best the owner in a cooking contest by making odd dishes like peanut butter and squid. One day he is forced to defend the shop from evil land developers by cooking with limited ingredients. It turns out he’s quite good when he’s not experimenting with things and saves the day. So the owner shuts down shop and sends him to a prestigious cooking school. It gets a Borders for being a rice cake of a manga.

Weltall reviews Tales of Wedding Rings. Our dish rag du jour is Sato who’s childhood friends with Hime. Some time in the indeterminable time between high school or middle, Hime ends up traveling into another dimension and Sato tags along. She is betrothed to a prince who is about to marry her right until a demon attacks. Hime kisses Sato which makes him married to her and grants the power to defeat the demon. Realm saved, right? Wrong. Sato now has to go out and collect his harem to gain enough power to beat the big bad. It also gets a Borders.

Manga Pulse 390: Apocalosseum

More sent manga makes its way into our PO box which means we have yet more to review. We gladly take requests because we like to please. And we’re lazy. We’ve mentioned that before but ease of reading saves us a lot of trouble when it comes to this and it keeps us from getting into a genre rut. Which could easily make the show turn stale faster than a rice cake in a Louisiana summer.

Tim gets sent Golosseum. There’s an alternate, maybe, future where Putin has a number of bracelets that prevent damage from bullets and radiation but allow fighting moves to penetrate. As such there’s now a threat of Russia taking over the world and seeking out the last of the three golden records that were shot into space as part of the Voyager program. The last one is, of course, being hidden in Japan by Rasputin. It’s just goofy and nonsensical enough to get a Read It Now.

Weltall reviews Apocalypse Zero. It’s finally here, a manga adaptation of the beloved film about Vietnam, based on a book about the Korean war. Who hasn’t wanted to see Martin Sheen as a Japanese school boy who was chosen to face the Vietnamese lacrosse team which is funded by China-Senpai? How about a dreamy version of Marlon Brando who takes a harem of girls to live out behind the equipment shed? It deserves nothing less than a Read It Now.

Manga Pulse 389: A Link to Manga

More manga incoming on the review request train. Now reading licensed, unlicensed, fanilations, and doujins. Not all of those will be reviewed of course. Licensed manga deserves no attention from us considering they don’t send us review copies. Which of course if why we’re not only reviewing licensed manga but adaptations of video games.

Tim reviews The Legend of Zelda Majora’s Mask. Which is, coincidentally, the last Zelda game he bothered to play. He tried to make excuses about how hard it was to keep up and how it’s not worth buying a separate console for a couple of games. As far as the manga, he’s thrown that Link isn’t a silent protagonist in it like in the games. It also takes place over a single reset of the town. It gets a Borders.

Weltall then reviews Ocarina of Time. Like in the last the Mask, Link is also not a silent protagonist. Weltall is disappointed that the sexual subtext between Link and the high priestesses isn’t made explicit. Though it’s hilarious how they’re made out now to seem like they’re dodging a dating bullet and retreating to their role as sage. “Sorry we can’t marry Link, it’s, uh, because I’m a sage. Yeah.” It also gets a Borders.

Manga Pulse 388: Re-Zelda

Which is why there can never be peace between East-asia and Oceania. On a brighter note, we will always have manga. Which seems to be in larger supply as it’s getting sent in. This saves us from having to select something and forces our hand in reviews. Mostly because we’re incredibly lazy and gladly take shortcuts.

Tim reviews The Legend of Zelda Twilight Princess. A manga done which appears to cover all the beats of the game. Tim finds it unsettling as Link isn’t a silent protagonist within the manga. Without having played the game, Tim has no reference on how accurate it ends up being. It gets a Borders for being readable and having good artwork.

Weltall then talks about Re-Monster. In what is quickly becoming a nauseating trend, it features a character reborn into an alternate world. Bonus trope points for being something like an MMO where the character is born as a goblin, has stats, and can gain levels. Being as he has a short lifespan as a goblin he has to quickly level up to hopefully escape dying at a few years old. It gets a Read It Now in spite of the well trod ground.

Manga Pulse 387: Totally Odd

A full request episode lays ahead. This is what happens when people send us manga. We are obligated to review it even if our personal bias says there’s no way it could be good. We will do our best to give it as fair a shake as we possibly can. But it’s really, really hard to do considering that the following two are prominently bearing the Tokyo Pop label on the spine.

Tim reviews Totally Spies. It is just like any cartoon manga cash grab that was made around that time in that it’s just an episode cut and pasted into a comic. Probably using something like a pirated copy of Corel Publisher. It gets a Burn It for the low effort garbage it is.

Weltall then reviews Fairly Odd Parents. Spoiler alert, it gets a Burn It. Just like with Weltall’s last OEL comic, he was untainted by exposure to the property beforehand. Too many jokes that just don’t land along with established rules that seem to be pulled from nowhere but are probably better explained in the series itself.

In a departure from the usual review method, Tim watched an episode of the series his OEL was based on. Not the same episode which became the “cine manga” unfortunately. His opinion was that the reason these weren’t successful was the media being adapted. As many of the jokes within the cartoons are visual and rely on timing which isn’t predictable in comic form as it is in video.

Manga Pulse 386: RyoPuff

Fall is coming and the pumpkin spice must flow. Even so, nothing stops the flow of manga reviews. Unless it’s something like sickness, late nights working, or a projectile vomiting dog. Other than things of that nature, nothing will stop our manga vengance.

Tim reviews Souzai Saishuka no Isekai Ryokouki. What happens when a nearly useless salary man die of mundanity in Japan? Usually their family dies of collective shame at being so pathetic. Out hero is given a chance by a goofy god to go to another planet and straighten things out. Something the local deities haven’t been able to manage on their own(they must be the incestuous offspring of the Greek pantheon). It gets a Crackers for some humorous moments.

Weltall then tackles a request sent via snail mail, Power Puff Girls. We haven’t seen the likes of this such as Ben 10. Just like that, they simply take episodes and turn them into comics, replete with dialogue cut and pasted onto crappy backgrounds. It’s completely worthless and makes Weltall glad he never watches the series so it had nothing to taint. Even should you receive this as a gift ignite it and urinate on the ashes, lest your grandchildren be cursed.

Manga Pulse 385: King Stalker

I think it may be time once more for a couple of manga. Handpicked by our inexpert staff who can barely manage to punch manga titles into the mighty oracle itself. At least they actually remember to prepare and be read by this episode. Instead of desperately attempting to catch up on the chapters required while the other mumbles their way through a review.

Tim has a request, The King’s Avatar. It’s a manhua where a man stumbles into a gaming cafe and takes over for the manager and demonstrates how awesome he is by making her win the match in a few minutes. It’s revealed he played pro in an MMO but, for reasons we have yet to see, was forced to give it up and leave. The interesting part is him trying to work his way back up while going over meta strategy of gaming. The dull part is seeing him “in the game” as his character which drops it to a Borders.

Weltall’s review, Ijousha no Ai, begins innocently enough when our main character is in elementary school receiving a confession. Elated, he offers to walk her home later. Shortly after, another girl confesses. Main finds her creepy and says he would but there’s this other girl see. So she goes off to kill the other girl. Main is still troubled seven years later when another girl becomes interested in him after he starts seeing his crazy stalker out of the corner of his eye. As with so many psychological slashers we review, it gets a Read It Now.

Manga Pulse 384: DevilDevilDevil Man

Something’s happened. We seem to have some sort of fever and lightheadedness. Accompanied by the smell of sulfur and an acrid smokey smell. No, Tim’s mother hasn’t appeared within a pentacle. We’ve caught the fever of Amon and he’s contagious. Continue reading Manga Pulse 384: DevilDevilDevil Man

Manga Pulse 383: Yo Neverland

Another trip to the bookstore? Yes, we made it out one more time. Just in case anyone didn’t believe we take advice from out listeners. Not the parts about lighting ourselves on fire because we know that’s all in good humor. That and we did that once and it wasn’t nearly as exciting as you might assume. A pity we no longer have the video.

Tim reviews The Promised Neverland. From the cover, Tim assumed it was one of those slice of life mangas that make him search longingly for a hangnail to remove. It is about an orphanage where a whole herd of children live in a seemingly timeless era where no one has a computer. Except when they’re taking tests. There’s a twist to everything which earns it a Read It Now.

Weltall’s Neeko wa tsurai yo is a manga about what we can only call “millennials”. The obnoxious version of a vague generation propped up by clickbaiting articles desperate to milk a little ad revenue from hate-sharing. The main character, Niito, is educated and young but not working or doing anything. She’s boring and would be improved by being thrown face first into an emptied pool. For the crime of being so boring that we’d rather be practicing calligraphy it earns a Burn It.

Manga Pulse 382: Devil Girl

After the general grumble about us not purchasing as many manga, and relying on other more lazy methods, we decided to purchase a least one more. This meant trekking all the way over to the local Barnes. We brought enough supplies to make the ten minute journey, browsed the shelves and choose a volume which hadn’t been reviewed before.

Tim purchased a copy of Devilman – Grimoire. Tim was only familiar with the original title thanks to the episodes brought over in the late nineties and his most recent review of the source material. While he wasn’t paying attention it bloomed into a couple of sequels. This time we have Amon living with Miki who believes herself to be a witch. She plays at summoning demons one night right as they’re attacked by some real ones. By accident, she summons Amon into Akira’s body and he starts killing demons around for reasons. It’s still good enough to get a Read It Now.

Weltalls physical copy of manga is Magical Girl Apocalypse. No, it’s not an apocalypse where magical girls are are driving resurrected gas contraptions along the desert of Australia. It’s an apocalypse of attacking magical girl looking things. While this does sound like yet another manga Weltall has reviewed, it gets a Crackers.