Category Archives: Manga Pulse

Manga Pulse 397: Terror Man

Bob Ross always like to say there are no such things as mistakes. Only happy accidents. This is pretty easy to say when you paint for a living in a studio without anyone to backsass you. For those of us living in the twenty first century with access to multiple forms of instant communication, this compounds things and makes mistakes impossible to avoid.

Which is how Weltall and Tim both ended up reviewing the same manhwa, Terror Man. We kick off with our protagonist sitting in class getting challenged by a classmate to rock paper scissors. He never loses because he has “eyes of misfortune” that turn the wrong choice into purple. This also allows him to cheat at tests.

Luckily the author knows we’re not interested in seeing this develop into some love triangle at school because a transfer student shows up and is purple. He goes to the mall with his dad’s live in maid. She’s from Russia and loves pressing her large breasts into his face to tease him. When he tells her he sees the building is purple and figures it will collapse, she asks him how they should evacuate people.

They, reasonably, come to the conclusion that no one will believe the place will collapse without evidence. Instead of pulling the fire alarm, she calls a friend to bring over guns so they can spook everyone out by pretending to be terrorists. Yes, that is a much better plan than calling in a bomb threat.

Tim read ahead a bit further than Weltall and found this appears to be the start of a theme where the protagonist runs into a disaster and decides to dress up as a terrorist to save people. It manages to land firmly in Read It Now territory.

Manga Pulse 396: Prison Hunter

Deep in the heart of the South American mountains there is a place, hidden among the peaks. There, artisans follow the craft of their ancestors, working with techniques that have remained unchanged for generations. All to make garbage that’s easily inferior to tools purchased at any big box store. Proving traditions can be stupid.

Tim reviews Prison School. The premise starts off simply enough. A school formerly restricted to girls only has decided to coed. How could this go wrong in a manga? Five guys decide to try and sneak a peek at the girls bath and get caught. The student council decides to punish them by placing them in prison uniforms and in a small prison on school grounds. It’s optional for the boys but if they don’t decide to participate, they’ll be expelled. It gets a Read It Now.

Weltall’s Hunter Age changes things up by being a full color comic. The first two chapters begin setting up a tragedy which befalls the kingdom. Then we flash forward sixteen years, just long enough for one of the protagonists to grow up and be clueless about it. When a prince has to escape assassins and plows directly into protagonist, the adventure begins. It gets a Crackers.

Popcorn Pulse 100: Fuckn Frogs

There was a time where Sam Elliott wasn’t the glorious be-mustached man that he’s been since cowboy films were invented. It wasn’t only two seconds after passing through the birthing canal, into the world, and then ordering a whiskey with a side of broken glass. Are word needn’t suffice for it has been well documented in movie form.

Continue reading Popcorn Pulse 100: Fuckn Frogs

Manga Pulse 395: Ridge of Rwby

Considering all of the genres of manga and all the subjects covered, there’s probably one thing among them that’s near taboo. That would be the original english language “manga”. We’re pretty sure that OELs were the meteor that killed the dinosaur of Tokyopop along with the nuclear winter of Levy’s ego. Yet there must always be an exception to the rule and a part of that is what we’ve been sent today.

Tim gets Rwby Anthology 1. Not being a fan of Rooster Teeth or any of their productions, Tim approached it decidedly neutrally. Hoping that, at worst, it was a generic fantasy manga with pointless rankings and fifteen year old wielding weapons that weigh as much as a cargo container. While Rwby, reportedly, has a story the anthology has no part of it. It is a series of disconnected scraps of rejected parts scooped up from the cutting room floor and crammed into a volume in order to milk fans of a few extra dollars. For this it earns a Burn It.

Weltall gets to Rwby Anthology 2. Like the other one, there’s nothing of substance for anyone who’s not already a dyed in the wool fan of this thing. There’s a short story with one joke that appears to be actually setup. One of the girls makes cookies that are hard as rocks and they get used as throwing stars on some random mooks. It also has random eight panel pages with interactions that are somehow more boring that the pointless stories about baking cookies. It also gets a Burn It.

Manga Pulse 394: Eat Me

You know what makes our shows and weddings better? Yes, money and professionalism. The answer we were looking for was themes. I’m sorry but no points for any of you. Also all answers must be in the form of an email to the hosts. While we prepare the next round, please enjoy the following messages from our sponsors.

With the theme of monster catching, Tim has Pokemon Adventures. The manga made to tie into the success of the original red and blue games. As such the protagonist is named Red and has rivalry with Blue. In the tradition of all adaptations of games, the rules of the game are ignored for the sake of making a plot favoring particular pokemon. Take for example the arc where Red uses a Pikachu to beat an Onix. It still gets a Borders.

Weltall then cracks open Yo-kai Watch. Nate Adams is a normal manga kid who’s parents are busy drinking and playing pachinko. He walks face first into the state’s program to curb population control by sending kids on deadly adventures when he cracks open a gashapon that has a watch and a yokai in it. He then starts seeing yokai, talking them out of being pests and gaining the ability to summon them to pester others. It lands on a Borders in a surprise to us.

Manga Pulse 393: Cry Platinum

Turn down the lights, pour a glass of moonshine, and join us for another installment of requested manga theater. Wherein our free will is taken away and we’re forced to read things sent to us. To cope, we will undoubtedly be tapping into something delicious or at least highly alcoholic. Just as long as we don’t start dipping into mixed drinks.

Tim reviews Platinum End. A manga brought to us by the same people who gave us Death Note. We start off with our main character deciding it’s time to kill himself, climbing to the roof of a skyscraper, then taking an asphalt swan dive. He gets saved feet before death by an angel. She offers him the ability to tavel anywhere on earth nearly instantly or to fire arrows that make people love him. He says he’ll consider not dying if she gives him both. Turns out he’s one of twelve people who have guardian angels who are playing last man standing with the winner getting to take the place of god. It squeaks into a Crackers and will be worth a follow up.

Weltall then reviews Umineko: When They Cry. It’s set on the eighties where the Ushiromiya family gets summoned to the island they own. There’s a legend that grandpa Ushiromiya got the seeds of their fortune by making a deal with a witch. But if he doesn’t pay her back by a particular time and date, she’ll exact a price from the family. There’s excellent pacing and well assembled pacing that erans it a solid Read It Now


Manga Pulse 392: Eternal Grave

Like an expensive sweater gifted to a nephew, we’ve returned quicker than anticipated. It’s another week, another drink and another manga. This time some self selected materials as we’ve got a few requests coming down the pipeline in the form of physical copies.

Tim reviews Marry Grave. It has a lighthearted style reminiscent of late nineties comedy manga. Our protagonist lives in a world that’s been invaded by goblins. He carries a coffin and is doing a world wide scavenger hunt attempting to raise his wife from the dead. There’s an interesting twist where we find out he died on his wedding night and his wife spent the rest of her life doing the same to resurrect him. It gets a Read it Now for being inventive and interesting.

Weltall reviews To Your Eternity. It begins with an alien lifeform landing on earth and copying a dying wolf. After taking it’s form, it wanders into an empty encampment where it finds a lone boy who’s been living along for a few years. It follows him along until he dies and takes his form. It’s very well paced and the story get more interesting from that point on, ending one a hilarious note made funnier by the serious tone thus far. It comfortably earns a Read it Now

Manga Pulse 391: Soma Rings

We like to have some post show discussions once in awhile. They usually aren’t recorded as they’re not very long. Tim is always begging off because he says he needs to go eat. This is accompanied by him dramatically clutching his middle and collapsing into a heap while asking for soup or breadsticks like this is an Olive Garden and not a makeshift recording studio.

Appropriate then that Tim reviews Shokugeki no Soma. Soma is a student who works at a ramen shop and is attempting to best the owner in a cooking contest by making odd dishes like peanut butter and squid. One day he is forced to defend the shop from evil land developers by cooking with limited ingredients. It turns out he’s quite good when he’s not experimenting with things and saves the day. So the owner shuts down shop and sends him to a prestigious cooking school. It gets a Borders for being a rice cake of a manga.

Weltall reviews Tales of Wedding Rings. Our dish rag du jour is Sato who’s childhood friends with Hime. Some time in the indeterminable time between high school or middle, Hime ends up traveling into another dimension and Sato tags along. She is betrothed to a prince who is about to marry her right until a demon attacks. Hime kisses Sato which makes him married to her and grants the power to defeat the demon. Realm saved, right? Wrong. Sato now has to go out and collect his harem to gain enough power to beat the big bad. It also gets a Borders.

Manga Pulse 390: Apocalosseum

More sent manga makes its way into our PO box which means we have yet more to review. We gladly take requests because we like to please. And we’re lazy. We’ve mentioned that before but ease of reading saves us a lot of trouble when it comes to this and it keeps us from getting into a genre rut. Which could easily make the show turn stale faster than a rice cake in a Louisiana summer.

Tim gets sent Golosseum. There’s an alternate, maybe, future where Putin has a number of bracelets that prevent damage from bullets and radiation but allow fighting moves to penetrate. As such there’s now a threat of Russia taking over the world and seeking out the last of the three golden records that were shot into space as part of the Voyager program. The last one is, of course, being hidden in Japan by Rasputin. It’s just goofy and nonsensical enough to get a Read It Now.

Weltall reviews Apocalypse Zero. It’s finally here, a manga adaptation of the beloved film about Vietnam, based on a book about the Korean war. Who hasn’t wanted to see Martin Sheen as a Japanese school boy who was chosen to face the Vietnamese lacrosse team which is funded by China-Senpai? How about a dreamy version of Marlon Brando who takes a harem of girls to live out behind the equipment shed? It deserves nothing less than a Read It Now.

Manga Pulse 389: A Link to Manga

More manga incoming on the review request train. Now reading licensed, unlicensed, fanilations, and doujins. Not all of those will be reviewed of course. Licensed manga deserves no attention from us considering they don’t send us review copies. Which of course if why we’re not only reviewing licensed manga but adaptations of video games.

Tim reviews The Legend of Zelda Majora’s Mask. Which is, coincidentally, the last Zelda game he bothered to play. He tried to make excuses about how hard it was to keep up and how it’s not worth buying a separate console for a couple of games. As far as the manga, he’s thrown that Link isn’t a silent protagonist in it like in the games. It also takes place over a single reset of the town. It gets a Borders.

Weltall then reviews Ocarina of Time. Like in the last the Mask, Link is also not a silent protagonist. Weltall is disappointed that the sexual subtext between Link and the high priestesses isn’t made explicit. Though it’s hilarious how they’re made out now to seem like they’re dodging a dating bullet and retreating to their role as sage. “Sorry we can’t marry Link, it’s, uh, because I’m a sage. Yeah.” It also gets a Borders.